From global wars to sustainable futures: children, politics and education | Farzana Shain

From global wars to sustainable futures: children, politics and education

Professor Farzana Shain

Tuesday 28th January 2014

Lecture 18.00 pm

Drinks Reception at 17.30pm

Westminster Theatre, Chancellor’s Building

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From global wars to sustainable futures: children, politics and education

Tuesday 28th January 2014

6pm

Westminster Theatre, Chancellor’s Building

Children growing up in the 21st century can expect to face a series of potential opportunities and challenges arising from technological advances, economic and geopolitical uncertainty and environmental risks.  They also live in a world that is characterised by growing inequalities and disparities between rich and poor. What all of this means for how children should be educated to think about social and political issues is a subject of ongoing academic debate. Drawing on research projects conducted over the last two decades this lecture will explore some of the tensions and contradictions inherent in state policies and professional practices aimed at preparing children for the future.  I will question whether notions of student voice, participation and sustainability currently embedded in educational policy and practice in Europe serve to promote or constrain the political agency of children and young people.

Farzana Shain

Farzana Shain is Professor of Sociology of Education and the Director of Postgraduate Research in Education in the School of Public Policy and Professional Practice. She has researched and written extensively within the field of sociology of education on topics including the leadership and management of change in the further education workplace, educational inequalities, and on the changing identities of young people in a global context. She is the author of two single-authored monographs The New Folk Devils: Muslim Boys and Education (2011), and The Schooling and Identity of Asian Girls (2003), which explore the social and political identifications of young people in a schooling context.

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