ONE-DAY WORKSHOP on War and Casualty Recording in the 21st century @ Keele University


fall of usa

Thursday, 22 September 2016, 10 am to 4.00 p.m.
Keele University, Chancellors Building, Room: CBA0.005

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The principal aim of this workshop is to make sense of human security. During the first two decades of the 21st century, several wars are raging already, from Afghanistan to Iraq, Nigeria, Syria and Ukraine. One of the most shocking aspects of these conflicts is the devastating level of human casualties. In the absence of any official interest on the part of the warring sides in documenting the human cost of these conflicts, a number of independent and mostly voluntary groups have been working daily to collect and process any information about civilian casualties. Even though their methodologies differ, the overall aim of all these groups is the same: to raise public awareness of the consequences of these wars in which our countries have been involved and to ask questions about political accountability. We are hoping that this workshop will provide us with an opportunity to discuss this topic around the following questions:

* How has the concept of security changed in the 21st century?

* Why is civilian casualty recording not a priority for states?

* How do different methods of recording casualties affect our understanding of wars in 21st century?

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PROGRAMME
Session 1
10.00 Coffee/ Tea
10.15 Welcome speech
10.30- 11.00 Lily Hamourtziadou (IBC), “Human security and casualty recording”
11.00-11.30 Discussions (Discussant: Bulent Gokay)
Session 2
11.45- 12.15 Chris Woods (Airwars), “Tracking international air wars: a civilian-focused perspective”
12.15- 12.45 Discussions (Discussant: Moran Mandelbaum)
1.00- 2.00 Lunch
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Session 3
14.00- 14.30 John Sloboda & Hamit Dardagan (Every Casualty), “The range of casualty recording approaches, and how they are being promoted in the international system”
14.30- 14.45 Naveed Sheikh (SPIRE), “Body Count: A Quantitative Review of Political Violence Across World Civilizations”
14.45- 15.15 Discussions (Discussant: Jane Krishnadas)

Session 4

15.15- 16.00 Panel Discussions on
“How do different methods of recording casualties affect our understanding of wars in 21st century?” (LH, CW, JS, NS, BG)
Everyone is welcome to the workshop, on a first come, first served basis. Since space is limited if you are intending to come please reserve your seat by sending a message to research.humssevents@keele.ac.uk

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